Acme Novelty Library Vol. 19

Review by Future Man
Chris Ware writes science fiction? Well, Chris Ware writes a character study (within the world of his Rusty Brown narative started in Acme Novelty Library Vol. 16) that delves into the brief pulp sci-fi writings of the character explored here. We thus get to read a science fiction story told through the reminiscing of our pitiful protagonist.

Orc Stain Vol. 1

Review by Future Man
Uniquely disgusting and perverse fantasy world inhabited almost exclusively by phallus obsessed orcs, driven by their lust for conquest. Truly original fantasy territory and some of the most awesome comic art around!

Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life

Review by Future Man
This book and the ideas it develops continue to change my life since finding it. I can think of no better guidelines to creating healthy relationships in all aspects of life.

Strange Embrace and Other Stories

Review by Future Man
Reading this in one sitting, you may feel yourself pulled into the strangely twisted and fetishizing world of the characters. The story develops as a series of character studies that will both creep you out and simultaneously create sympathetic attraction.

Lore: Premiere Edition

Review by Future Man
The presentation is outstanding and the story and illustrations within are so deserving of the oversize treatment that it gets here. A large portion of the story is actually delivered through a narative from the diary of one of the characters and therefore it is told without illustration. When the story shifts to the present, it goes to a comic format with amazing illustrations from Ashley Wood. Its good to finally have this whole story collected in one book, because that is how it should be presented. It took me reading all the way through the first chapter which is much longer than most comics, before I even could make any sense of what was going on, but once I made it that far I was hooked. The one complaint that I have is actually with Ash Wood's art, which is sometimes so stylized that it can be confusing. Nonetheless, I would still give it a five star rating :)

Low Moon

Review by Future Man
I've awaited this book for months now and my expectations for it couldn't have been much higher, but it still managed to exceed them. There are actually 5 separate stories contained in this book: "Emily Says Hello", "Low Moon", "&", "Proto Film Noir", and "You are Here" which are all very different in their subject matter and style of storytelling. This makes for a really enjoyable read, because of the variation herein. I was glad to see that this book went less with the slapsticky style of the recent "The Last Musketeer" and went back to a more serious and kind of surreal tone that were seen in "Hey, Wait" and "The Iron Wagon". Don't get me wrong though, Jason's humor still comes through in the surreality of the stories.

Its awesome to see Jason getting his works published in hardcover too, as I feel his comics are deserving of the respect. All in all, this was really enjoyable for me and I would recommend this to both established fans of Jason and people who are looking to see what he's all about.

The Incal Classic Collection

Review by Future Man
Spiritual science fiction for the psychedelic shaman. The comic book equivalent to Jodorowski's Holy Mountain with demension shattering art by French comics master Moebius!

X'ed Out

Review by Future Man
This is AMAZING! The first extended piece of Burns' comic work that I've seen in full color and he is doing things with color that I've never seen in comics before. If you are a fan of Charles Burns this is one of his best yet! X'ed Out is the first in a planned trilogy and at this rate, may become my new favorite piece of his once it's completed.

Outcast of Redwall: A Tale from Redwall

Review by David Zhang
was good when i read it in 6th grade

GoGo Monster

Review by David Zhang
A haunting coming of age story. Very unique

As the World Burns: 50 Simple Things You Can Do to Stay in Denial

Review by David Zhang
Packed with cynicism, dark humor, and his usual bravado, Derrick and Stephanie provokes and entertains in this timely critique of environmental activism. Recommended.

Pharmako/Gnosis: Plant Teachers and the Poison Path

Review by Peter Olmsted
Big focus on spiritual experience with various entheogenic substances. Very fantastical.

Pharmako/Dynamis: Stimulating Plants, Potions, & Herbcraft

Review by Peter Olmsted
An in depth exploration into the world of some of the most popular drugs in our world today, stimulants. Pendell provides detailed and poetic articles of cacao, tea, coffee, and other empire building stimulants.

Pharmako/Poeia: Plant Powers, Poisons, and Herbcraft

Review by Peter Olmsted
Artful mix and match of poetry, science, and historical usage of many common and not so common inebriating herbs and concoctions.

Celestial Gallery

Review by David Zhang
wow

Cerebus Vol. 1: Cerebus

Review by Judd Morse
Lemme just say that Cerebus is one of my all-time favorite comic book series. What started out as a kind of lark, a fun way to make fun of fantasy staples, took on a life of its own and became something else entirely over the course of its 27 year run. I highly recommend Cerebus to pretty much anyone with a pulse. But if you want to get into Cerebus, maybe don't start with volume one. Jump to at least Volume two. Hell, I think I started with volume nine, went down to two, then five, then back to one and two again, then three and four and went pretty much linearly from there. Volume one is good. It's really good. But it's kind of inaccessible if you don't know what you're in for. Jumping in mid-run and playing catch-up is the way to go with Cerebus.

A Disease of Language

Review by Judd Morse
" We are insensate molecules, assembled from the accidental code engraved upon our genes. Mud that sat up. Chemicals mingle in our sediment and in their interactions and combustions we suppose we feel, suppose we love. We reproduce, mathematically predictable as spores within a petri dish. We function briefly, then subside once more to the unknowing silt. We are a blind contingency, an unimportant restlessness of dirt and yet Rossetti paints his dead Elizabeth, head tilted back on her impossibly slim throat, eyes closed against the golden light surrounding her. Clay looks on clay, and understands that it is beautiful. Through us, the cosmos gazes on itself, adores itself, breaks its own heart. Through us, matter stares slack-jawed at its own star-dusted countenance and knows, incredulously, that it knows. And knows that it is universe."

A Confederacy of Dunces

Review by Judd Morse
I love books that can make me howl with laughter. A Confederacy of Dunces is one of the sweetest, most hilarious, most satisfying books I've ever read. These are the types of characters to which all writers should aspire to create. And all people should aspire to become.

A Clockwork Orange

Review by Judd Morse
Dystopian science fiction is great for gloomy spring days spent inside. Fun fact: For several decades, there were actually two versions of this book. The US version was Stanley Kubrick's blueprint for his film. But, like the film, the US version didn't include the final chapter in the strange times of Alex, his droogs, and the old ultraviolence. The final chapter was deemed too controversial for American audiences. It wasn't until 20 years after its original publication that the lost 21st chapter was finally printed in American texts. I for one say it's worth rereading just to get to that lost chapter and find out what really does become of the psychopaths in postmodern society.

300

Review by Judd Morse
Frank Miller's a crazy fucker, but he can tell a good story.

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