Review by Matthew Gilmore
I feel like NLP is one of those concepts that we don't naturally give a name to, but something that we all understand in some sort of way. Whether consciously or not, as humans we all have a tendency towards falling into certain social patterns simply by nature of how we're wired. However, it is very centering to see these as patterns ingrained in particular cues and responses. It's too easy to fall into a cycle of only interpreting responses in the context of a singular moment, rather than getting in touch with the patterns inherent in our social design. I always worry that I'll find this sort of pattern-based approach to understanding our social workings disheartening, as it implies a certain lack of free will in our interactions, but the fact that we can also take more of a meta-cognitive approach and dissect our thoughts in the moment then implies a certain level of autonomy and liberation that is both daunting and comforting. One gripe I have here that I have with other similar works is it seems that there is a focus in writers on the mind in applying their writings and methods to others, rather than trying to develop a better sense of self. That being said, as the book says, we are all pursuing excellence, so it must be up to us whether that excellence requires intrinsic, extrinsic, or a combination of factors.

Review by Matthew Gilmore
I didn't know what to expect when I started reading Principia. I was aware of Eris and her discordant ways, but can't say I've ever thought on the concept of a Eris-centric religion. I do find chaos and entropy to be particularly interesting in their power to construct a more spontaneous and exciting world. As I read through the various incantations, by-laws, and statues of the religion of Eris, I began to get a sense of my own internal relationship with chaos and how much I enjoy being both an agent and recipient of entropy. I definitely intend to read through this book again with different eyes and new perspective some day, because I feel like there is always something new to be found in the comfort of chaos. If you need to get in touch with the entropy inside, give the Principia Discordia a read and then start cultivating that constructive discord!

Review by Riley Reasor
Baudrillard's concepts of Hyperreality, Sign Value and Simulation are excellent tools to analyze the cultural climate of contemporary America. His reckless spitballing and theorizing is what makes this text good and also why it suffers. I particularly enjoyed the descriptions of Santa Barbara, LA area and California deserts where I spent much of my life. Baudrillard turned the lens from the Marxist fixation on production towards analyzing consumption... A few of his observations concerning race and gender in this novel are a bit unnuanced and offensive but occasionally insightful. I got more out of the first half of the book than the end "utopia realized". He examines America with the lens of the European anthropologist in a sci fi film but the postmodern sarcasm can also become exhausting. While this book has some flaws it might be an accessible window into concepts like Hyperreality, sign value, and Simulacra which offer insight into many current events. I found myself busting up laughing a good deal reading this as well as scratching my head at some of his conclusions... Overall a fun read. 3.5 stars.

Review by Riley Reasor
Lately I have been getting a lot out of reflecting on some of failed promises surrounding the technological innovations of the 90s. One of my first political memories is also the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Sadie Plant was part of a group of thinkers that coalesced under the moniker "Cultural Cybernetic Research Unit" at Warwick University in the late 90s and early 00s. Other thinkers that came out of this area of thought include Nick Land and Mark Fisher. Sadie connects cybernetics to questions of identity and gender, discusses Alan Turing, The Difference Engine and Ada Lovelace, the genetics of peacocks, evolution and xenoestrogens from plastic wreaking havoc on hormones and reproduction. While I'm not sure some of the optimism surrounding Deleuzian visions of rhizomatic organization, decentralized networks, and technological empowerment panned out quite the way Sadie envisioned it is refreshing to read a more optimistic vision for the potential of these things at a moment in time when we seem to be at somewhat of a cultural impasse and often forget how we got here. 3.5 stars Pairs well with Humdog's much more cynical essay on Community in Cyberspace.

Review by Riley Reasor
This is one of the denser more perspective altering books I read in 2020. Recommended to anyone interested in the media climate of the 21st century, the mechanics of capitalism, art, commodification and the failure to imagine a different future. Investigating the Situationists and understanding the successes and failures of what happened in France in 68 may also provide some clues to more effective strategies moving forward. An interesting idea I have encountered in further reading is that rather than subversion (detournement) and recuperation (reintigration by capital) maybe our desire is already formatted by Capitalism. Related Cinema : A Cat Without a Grin by Chris Marker

Review by Riley Reasor
A Power Stronger Than Itself chronicles Chicago’s Association for the Advancement of Creative Music and the relationship of a black cultural identity to experimental music through interviews and personal accounts with members such as Roscoe Mitchell, Leo Smith, Muhal Richard Abrams, Anthony Braxton, Joseph Jarman, George Lewis, Don Moye and Fred Anderson. The book describes the members' political and economic backgrounds involving racism and poverty and the struggle of making a living as a jazz musician to outline the necessity of the collective. The AACM began in 1965 as a music school, system of dues, gigs and wages, and united these elements with a strong aesthetic vision under idioms such as “Great Black Music”, “Creative Music” or “Ancient to the Future”. Also chronicled are sometimes contentious relationships with what is viewed as Amiri Baraka’s more essentialist visions of a black cultural identity, a complex relationship to European Art Music as well as race and appropriation as well as the political background and possibly utopian elements of experimental and avant garde music as it relates to a black cultural identity. This book may be of interest to anyone interested in the history of jazz and experimental music or anyone who believes that radical political change also involves some element of departure from a paradoxical relationship between mass culture and individualism towards a collective model that creates its own community infrastructure to aid in the creation of different futures. Related Listening: Anthony Braxton - Creative Orchestra Music 1976 Muhal Abrams Orchestra - The Hearinga Suite Territory Band - Atlas 2 Roscoe Mitchell - Sound Leo Smith - Divine Love Art Ensemble of Chicago - Fanfare for the Warriors Fred Anderson Quintet - Another Place

Review by Chelsea Lohr
When someone asks me what comics/graphic novels I like, I inevitably mention Chester Brown's Paying For It. I don't even know if I like it exactly. But I haven't stopped thinking about it since I first read it, which I think is a recommendation in itself.

Review by Chelsea Lohr
Caitlin Doughty has been working publicly to spread death positivity for years via the Order of the Good Death and her Youtube channel Ask a Mortician. This is her first book about her first job in a Bay Area crematorium. She offers an unmatched take on death and the cremation process, rituals and cultural values, and the ways capitalism and fear interrupts them. She's also really funny!

Review by Chelsea Lohr
You don't need any background in Buddhism to grasp Pema Chodron's messages in this book. I picked this book up after suddenly losing my ability to walk and I still keep a copy by my bed to flip through whenever I need a reminder of how to be present with pain.

Review by Matthew Gilmore
I don't know where to start on how this book has impacted me. I've been dealing with a lot of trauma-related issues and a desire to actually understand them lately, trying to rationalize how my brain responds to things and how better to interact with others when the trauma brain has a mind of its own. Learning more about how the brain steps through its assessment of needs and which needs are being attacked or seemingly being attacked in a traumatic response has really helped me to quiet the mental chatter constantly telling me I'm not good enough, that I'm only destined to hurt people, or that I'm actively hurting people in the present simply by merit of existence. It's helped me identify times in my past that I was particularly sensitive to the opinions of others and how those interactions at the time shaped my confidence in my own reasoning and those around me. I also appreciate the attention to a diverse set of influences on the mind, not only parents and teachers, but environmental factors, health, drugs, and isolation. I had been avoidant of trying to understand any of my trauma for so long because I convinced myself (as a result of that trauma!) that I couldn't make good choices regarding my mental health, that I was literally incapable of doing anything regarding my own state that wouldn't just amount to being an awful person or going down a dark path. Absurd, I know, and Robert Anton Wilson helped show me precisely how absurd it is to think such negative things about yourself constantly when they're just the voices of other folks still living in your head, telling you who you are, how you are, and what you are and aren't capable of. I know it's cliche, but this book has shown me that we are capable of anything we put our minds to, even unraveling 20+ years of mental spaghetti. I recommend this book to anyone struggling with understanding trauma, how that relates to others, and how to identify sources and put them in perspective rather than grasping at straws for an explanation in the moment. I'm learning more and more how important it is to recognize what tools are available for understanding the mind, and that we don't have to do it alone, or worse, transfer the problem to someone else by not understanding our own needs, boundaries, imprints, or psychology. Let Wilson remind you how great you are for existing, for persevering in the face of an absurd world, and how important it is to understand the nuances of your own mental workings!

Review by Matthew Gilmore
I'm only about 60% of the way through this book and I can already say that this is a piece of literature I've been looking for my whole life. I don't know what lead Bill Harvey to write this book, and I can certainly say it was not any knowledge of me or my personal problems, but as I read through these pages I feel both a familiarity and aversion to the things being said at the same time. In keeping with the theme of the book, I'm not going to give it a premature full review while still in the thick of the transformative thinking it is inspiring, but admittedly I also need a single point so I can test out voting functionality on the main page. I look forward to being able to provide a more thorough review of this book once I am done with it, as well as peruse more of the chaos magic section, as I'm so terribly excited to keep learning about my brain and how to decouple it from the stream of consensus consciousness I've been spending my whole life stressing about how to fit myself tidily into.

Review by Meg Duke
3.5 stars. A non-intimidating introduction to dreaming, from a westerner's perspective. Fontana is careful to offer multiple perspectives and suggest rather than state, leaving room for personal interpretation and exploration. by touching briefly on many aspects within dreams/the dream state but without delving too deeply on any subject, this book offered tinder for my imagination. but I did want a LOT more from non-western perspectives...

Review by Bo Richardson
I was first introduced to the Cold Mountain poems in college around 1972. The Gary Snyder translation showcased the outsider anti-materialist mild-anarchist version of Cold Mountain’s Buddhism and Daoism. Not many words, lots of fun. This more recent Red Pine version has more words, more scholarship. Everything about the approach of Red Pine is different from that of Gary Snyder. Vladimir Nabokov said that translating a poem is really writing a poem about a poem. Snyder’s poems and Red Pine’s poems are so different only sometimes does a casual reader recognize a previously loved poem. Red Pine’s scholarship and poetry are both very good. Red Pine is a self-financing scholar and in his dedication to his translation of the Dao De Ching he thanks DSHS and the Food Stamp people for their support rather than some university department chair. I thought this showed a lower Bohemian sensibility and humor. Gary Snyder grew up in Snohomish and has written about places in Whatcom County. Red Pine lives in Port Townsend.

Review by Meg Duke
a delightful and fanciful bedtime story for all politicos

Review by Bill Svoboda
The subject matter (not surprisingly!) is dark...and detailed. The impeccably sarcastic prose reads like a non-fictional (and subversive) JRR Tolkien crossed with a modern Jonathan Swift-this was actually NOT the kind of book Charles Duff (linguist, teacher, translator and best selling author) usually wrote. As a combination history of hanging, anti capital punishment satire and general send up of British arrogance and stuffiness it is perhaps overambitious. For best results, start by reading the list of chapters ... and then sip rather than guzzle.

Review by Bill Svoboda
Another winner from PM Press's "Outspoken Authors" series. This has the same basic format as "The Lucky Strike Plus"- (Alternate History, Essay, Interview.) Ursula LeGuin gave "Mammoths Of The Great Plains" a big thumbs up. I just wish there could have been more mammoths-and that this was a real history instead of an alternate one.

Review by Bill Svoboda
The "pedophilia" isn't really pedophilia-but it's real enough to have triggered a number of readers- if you think you may be one of them, it might be a good idea to skip this book. Also, it's not "spooky".... in some ways it barely classifies as horror. The vampire protagonist/narrator isn't particularly evil and becomes too familiar to the reader to feel mysterious. All that being said, this is an outstanding book in it's own unique, provocative way. The writing is up to par with say, Anne Rice -too bad Octavia Butler passed before completing the sequel(s?). RIP

Review by Meg Duke
*filthy* satire. no matter what bullshit politics are distorting the time period you read this in, it'll still be horrifically applicable to the brutal boots of society and government that squash us.

Review by Meg Duke
Pretty interesting stuff. Not only did I learn about the history of the car bomb, but I also learned a bit more about war history in general. Be prepared for a ton of name drops and references, not all of which are essential to understanding what Davis is talking about. Spoiler: turns out the "poor man's air force" is often used by men not so poor --- the CIA as the primary example.

Review by Meg Duke
the stories and art use plants' patience and persistence to explore the authors' existential musings

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